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with compliance departments and upstarts with energy and ideas. this status inequality demands our attention. last week's bipartisan passage of the unfunded mandate's transparency and information act is a good start, but much more must be done. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the chair will receive message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: mr. secretary. the secretary: i am directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina eek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, transitioning from military to civilian life can be challenging for our veterans. the skill sets learned while serving in the armed forces are highly valued and confidence is extraordinary of veterans who have proven work ethic.
will be recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of the nuclear energy sector, not only do nuclear power plants provide affordable, reliable and clean energy, they also provide many quality high-paying jobs and are the backbone of many communities. my district is shome to a nuclear plant -- is home to a nuclear plant that employs near 700 people. nuclear energy is a secure energy source that plays a vital role in a responsible, all-of-the-above energy policy. mr. davis: it is the biggest provider of reliable, efficient, clean energy and it provides on-demand energy 24/7. the recent record cold temperatures in the midwest show the importance of energy diversification. many of my constituents saw steep increases in their electric bill. while pipes froze and transportation became difficult because of iced roads and bridges, nuclear power remained consistent. i worry that things could have become worse if nuclear power wasn't able to fill the gaps where needed. this is why i stand here today in support of nuclear energy and all of my constituents and the hardworkin
cell energy and all of them hitting 52 week highs. all thanks to to as low. the unstoppable stock. adam: the obama administration is rolling out its 2015 budget and singing the familiar tune. can use a tax hikes? cheryl: oil prices reversing course, down 4% after closing at the highest level in five months yesterday. commodity analyst matt smith and phil flynn saying get used to this volatility. the energy burrito and the mighty fallen coming up next. when does your work en does it end after you've expanded your business? after your company's gone public? and the capital's been invested? or wn your compan's bought another? is it over after you' given back? you never stop achieving. that's why, at barclays, our ambition is to always realize yours. coach calls her a team player. she's kind of special. she makes the whole team better. he's the kind of player that puts the puck, horsehide, bullet. right where it needs to be. coach calls it logistics. he's a great passer. dependable. a winning team has to have one. somebody you can count on. somebody like my dad. this is my dad. somebody li
of the leverage that president putin does have. partly, he has the energy, which flows underneath ukraine and supplies so much of europe. and more than that, he has now threatened, we are told, to no longer use the united states dollar as a currency on the world market. what if he did that? maria bartiromo from the fox business network will join us next to talk about the ramifications of such a thing. whether he could do it and what it would mean to our economy. would it, as the russians say, cripple our economy? that's next. t! [bell rings] this...is jane. her long day on set starts with shoulder pain... ...and a choice take 6 tylenol in a day which is 2 aleve for... ...all day relief. hmm. [bell ring] "roll sound!" "action!" [ chainsaw whirring ] humans -- sometimes liferips us up. sometimes we trip ourselveup. and although the mistakes may seem to just keep coming at you, so do the solutions. like multi-policy discounts from liberty mutual insurance. save up to 10% just for combining your auto and home insurance. call liberty mutual insurance at... [ thump ] to speak with an insurance
that with ed royce. i think we need to take the fact that america in 2020 will be the leading world energy producer, so let's talk about that being used to be an offset to the russians because their energy is their weapon. if we're looking to make russia a pariah state, that's where the president needs to be talking. >> listen, i think there's a lot to be said for that. as you know i'm more of a clean energy guy but taking that away from russia, their monopoly in energy, is good. but republicans are missing an opportunity to look more bipartisan. >> congressman engel, i think what bothers republicans is how much the president and the administration seems to have empowered putin over the past few years. just to give you a couple of examples. russia controls the northern distribution network which is one of the main access points in afghanistan that our troops rely on to get supplies and food and water. putin controls that. putin is controlling our syria chemical weapons collection deal, which is a farce. putin is undermining our negotiations in iran. have we given him too much power? why ha
. the energy minister went on about climate change. -- i haven'ting to had time to get into the climate change debate. [laughter] he is the energy minister, mr. speaker. as a happy that there are climate change deniers in his government that is he happy that there are climate change deniers in his government? >> i praise him for his commitment to climate change. i like the new style. i think this is much more refreshing. his government has a solid track record of cutting carbon and investing in nuclear. the biggest energy program we have seen in this country for the first time in a long time we are on track to the renewable target. let's congratulate him on the record on the energy environment. >> the whole country would have heard they cannot answer the question about whether you need to believe in man-made climate change to be part of his government. part to be ac matter of individual conscience. these to be the thing that was a passion above all else. >> order. order. >> the questions and the answers will be heard however long it takes for those who are exercising their vocal cords and the
's parliament, kerry promised a billion dollar loan guarantee designed to ease the sting of energy costs. officials traveling with kerry had voiced concern that russian president vladimir putin who last week sent tens of thousands of forces may be preparing for a larger invasion of eastern ukraine. putin himself looking relaxed at a state res dnls outside moscow held a rare news conference in which he suggested any such broader invasion would be a last resort but well within russia's right because they have received approval by yanukovych. >> even if i take a decision to use armed force, it would be legitimate, in the norms of international law, and in this case, it would also correspondent to our interest in protecting the people who are closely tied to us historically, culturally, economically. >> kerry has emphasized the u.s. wants to de-escalate the crisis, responding to putin's comments. >> he really denied there were troops in crimea? >> yes, he did. >> i have spoken directly to president putin today as i can. it is not appropriate to invade a country and at the end of a barrel of
television service. number three is fuel energy. fuel cell, which reports earnings on march 10, is one of the most overbought stocks. >> i am talking cars. the auto-parts retailer reporting in nine percent increase as well as sales growth of four percent. severe winter weather actually helps sales by accelerating demand area >> number one is radioshack. shares plunged more than 25% after the electronics chain announced plans to close up to 1100 stores in the u.s., or 20% of its footprint. radioshack also reported a significantly wider loss for the fourth quarter. are also keeping our eyes on shares of smith and west. the gunmaker reporting earnings after the close today. a bumpy ride for alix steel, and paul barrett joins us from washington. on god's.t with you we saw them take off in 2013 under the threat of more regulation. what is happening, why this decline now? >> there has not been any kind of tragedies. if you take a look at federal background check which analysts say can be a relatively good barometer for sales, they tend to increase we see some kind of national shooting. auror
forward an energy plan that shows how we can move out of this. i fault them as well. no government has been willing to stand up to these powerful interests. and that's why people are confus confused. many people, most people in america know climate is changing, most of those who say that know that it's human caused. i think that most of the debate is about the science is a pseudodebate. what we don't have is a real debate about how to change the energy system right now. >> but let me ask you on that, note, bill. because the president, i mean, first of all, it's not just america. we need an international quorum for action. >> that's correct. >> 7 of the 200-plus countries account for -- china is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases. india is right up there. they have not been particularly forward leaning on this issue in terms of gathering international action on it. so what -- internationally what should be done to increase, i think, the sort of buy-in, if you will from other countries and then i want to ask you as a follow-up after you answer that, how do you grade the president's
and energy that that private company has brought to the afghan media scene -- more about that in a minute. they are not the only ones. there are something like 75 television stations and 175 radio stations. either normal sleeve vigorous, varied conversation going on on the airways and in afghanistan. largest but be the it is one of many. that is a notable piece of media landscape. the third thing is as an embassy thecial i went around country and often visited tiny in villages and small towns around afghanistan. there are a lot of them. going to a one-room fm station and a small town but does not have to much going for it and you find young people at the microphone finding some way to get a little bit and music on with a basic tape recorder. in many cases the stations were help ofby locals with ngos, which is resented by some of interviews. while they run some local -- ent, maybe have another green shoot and a strong one, an important one. a varied source of strength for afghanistan going forward. we are here in this panel to discuss what i think is one of the most important advances over
is exceptionally weak in ukraine. and what's more, the eu imports most of its energy from russia, which is a top oil producer. should putin take the risk and turn off the taps, as he did with ukraine in 2009 and in 2006, it could spell disaster for europe and, perhaps, the u.s. as the "new republic" notes, "any supply shocks in europe that send prices higher will have ripple effects that raise gas prices in the united states." fiona hill is an expert on russia and eurasian affairs at the brookings institution. fiona, thanks for being here. let's start with that question. you do have a lot of criticism of the president saying that he needs to take stronger action. what conceivable stronger action could be taken? >> well, the problem is, as you've just laid out, that the strong action that the president can take really is very dependent on being in lock step with our european allies. the real impact of any sanctions would only be felt on russia if the eu and other key allies are with us in the way that we are all acting together in the sanctions against iran and our dispute over iran's nuclear pro
issues. this is the energy department's largest clean up anywhere in the united states. trying to take those 56 million-gallons of radioactive sludge that were in underground tanks. they are trying to turn that into solid glass. it is a massive project. how does this work? >> well the 17 self-tanks are distributed over quite a few square miles with an intricate net of pumps and pipes. when it is pumped to facility that i was previously supporting, we would then treat that waste chemically to get some of the more dangerous constituents out of it and then after we had treated it chemically we would put it into a melter with glass heat it up to high temperatures. >> the tanks that were underground were beginning to leak. they were old and the danger was some of them were fairly close to the colombia river and there is fear that somehow some of that radioactive material could get into the river. >> it is a fear based on reality. the single shell tanks which were actually decommissioned in the 40s and 50s, those tanks are known to have been leaking into the environment for years. we have co
. why? because rush ha is blackmailing europe over energy. supplies a third of oil and natural gas to the eu. the more oil and natural gas the u.s.a. and canada can produce and distribute, the weaker russia becomes on the world stage i fervently hope president obama understands that finally, there is barack obama's legacy. hear's a satirical picture posted on fox nation showing the contrasting styles of putin and obama. obviously the russian leader sees himself as macho man. the president sees himself as a renaissance man who wants to accommodate. but there is no accommodating putin. and if the u.s.a. looks weak on this one, believe me, we'll pay a heavy price. as will the president's historical reputation. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight reaction joining us from boston fox news military analyst colonel david hunt and -- am i making mistakes here, mr. whiten? >> no, i don't think so. i would add a few other things to the list. you know, we can be specific with building -- helping central europe get free of russian energy. it's russian energy that's been used agai
, the reality is that russia has a lot of nuclear weapons. their economy is modest except for energy, and they're not a great power, but they have the ability to pick them off one at a time. their neighbors abroad, they can do that, they went into georgia as you'll recall. ukraine is enormously important to the world. and the idea that we would have created an environment that is hospitable is outrageous. it's not just putin, it's going to be the people's republic of china. even if it's not in cahoots with put putin. >> it seems like the president and the secretary of state keep lecturing putin, that they have a 19th century mentality, this is the 21st century. he made a speech where -- in which he says the great power conflict is a thing of the past. i want to ask you about these words the president uttered many listen to this closely. >> those countries that are large like russia or china, we have the kind of relationship with them we're not getting into conflicts of that sort at least over the last several decades, there's been a recognition that neither country benefits from that kind of g
whether to the level to buy yandex, concerned about the energy situation in germany, yeah, i mean maybe not time to pick things up. i agree with warren buffett. not hard to do, obviously, given his long-term track record. this is where you pick. you're getting a chance. he had a big sell-off friday afternoon and he kind of rallied in the last half hour. if we get those prices again at 330, count me in. count me in. >> fixing my collar here. always important that you look well in the morning when delivering and trying to opine and provide insight. >> the clothes make the man. >> of course on that note, studying up on ukraine and crimea and russia's history with it, and what khrushchev did in '54, whether he gave to them, whether thhe didn't want to dea with it. this forces money manages are to hit the history books. >> my producer, ukraine is -- actually i read the stories, warren's say, remember, 50% of the whole country is russian and the crimea is russian. so, this is kind of a -- apparently there's questions about resources and they use a lot of water in crimea. >> ukraine. >> a lot
, pointing out that russia is germany's biggest supplier of energy. we know that merkel spoke with our president last night. she spoke with putin several times since the crisis started. could she be a key player in potentially resolving this situation? >> yes. absolutely. i mean, germany, after all, is the most important military and economic power in europe. the problem here, as you rightfully point out, is that most of germany's natural gas supplies run through that natural gas pipelines through ukraine, from russia, to germany. she's already signaled that she's not in favor of imposing economic sanctions on russia. well, if she's not in favor of supporting economic sanctions on -- on russia as well as denying russia a space in the g-8 and turning that into the g-7, it sort of defangs the capacity of the united states to act forcefully with putin if he decides that, well, what -- what matters to him if he moves his forces into eastern ukraine. who's going to stop him. >> yeah, and josh, i also want to touch on the energy and economics issues which are important here. >> yeah. >> a lo
increase in energy prices which there already seems to. it's not as though their customers in europe can stop buying energy because they're unhappy with what is happening in ukraine. i'm not sure that it hurts russia all that much. >> earlier it was looking like anti-government protesters had the upper hand. we had yanukovych on the run. we had tymoshenko released from prison. but does this show us now that progress was not necessarily a win? >> absolutely. and i think that's the real missing story here that has not been adequately covered. what is the legally elected president of ukraine, mr. yanukovych, who is now taking refuge in russia and still claims to be the legal president, some how you could have a street demonstrators including some very violent armed people drive the president out of the capitol and say, okay, we win now, you lose. you have to accept this. the russians are saying, um, no, we don't. we have cards to play here, too. we don't recognize this government or so-called government in kiev which frankly doesn't even control kiev. the people on the streets say if they a
,hose particularly energy. this has been about for the russian economy. the currency has fallen. the stock market is down. there was a reaction to this that may affect putin's economy. but i mention one other thing? is this beautiful and large country called ukraine. suppose ukraine finally after failing in 2004 get it right -- democracy, gets rid of corruption, the economy is improving, and it is there of the border for russia. i think it makes him nervous if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia. if the sanctions fail? what do you do it the pressure with his he continues own ambitious ideas of expanding within his own borders and spears of influence? >> go back to georgia in nato. if you tried something like that ay with one area that has significant russian popularity -- population, he would be attacking nato. that would be an entirely different set of circumstances. i have no illusions that in the short term, we will be able to ambitions.tin's in the long term, we can curb those ambitions in many ways, b
? >> yes, some of them will work, there's no question about that. it's just a question of how much energy is going to be put into the device to get it to work. what's going to be the most energy efficient way to do this, because remember, we have to get the craft up there that's going to do the work, we have to give it capability to maneuver around in space. once the technology that's going to be used to remove something from orbit, one of the ideas of attaching a tether so it builds friction and pulls the object down is not such a bad idea, because it doesn't require a lot of material to do that. if you could just push something out of orbit, that might not be a bad idea, because it may not require a large energy budget to make that work. you keep the expenses down in energy and materials and get the job done, it's just that those methods are slow and there's a lot of material that needs to be cleaned up. if there was a faster way to do it, that might be better. >> boy, that's certainly a big problem. nasa's budget was just announced or at least what they're hoping for the budget the nex
in california. when ordinary energy is put in the hands of extraordinary people, amazing things happen. the kind of things that drive us to do more, to go further, to be better. we're dedicated to being a company you can count on, because you've always been customers we believe in. your energy plus ours. together, there's no limit to what we can achieve. >>> we wanted to slow down and pause and dig down to what led to this point. it is in europe and they are all strong members of nato. the united nations has an obligation to protect them. let's go inside as well so we can understand the divisions there that are driving part of this. you get to the western part of the country. only 5% of these people speak russian. although to be clear, the center of this crisis 60% of the people speak russian. this plays out in the elections that have taken place in the crown t country. going back to 2010, his support in that eastern part of the country where they speak russian 50% of this vote was here. in the western part of the country the support bordering poland there. here 50-75% where kieve the capitol is
bilateral and multilateral interactions. energy cooperation talks were canceled. the obama administration has placed a hold on all aspects of bilateral interaction. host: is it enough to have sanctions to influence what is going on in ukraine? the economic situation in russia may be more marvel to economic pressures than most -- may be more vulnerable to economic pressure than most people think. other analysts are not so sure. the russian system is extremely opaque. not a lot of good data is coming out. they have the ability to manipulate that data. has taken the decision that whatever costs or pressure he is to suffer under, willing to take those costs. he still sees the benefits. what is the point of all this? putin, ukraine and crimea are personal issues. many russians believe that crimea is russian territory. the people there identify as russian and crimea should always be a part of russia. there is a nationalistic element , a domestic, political element. has aly, putin long-standing policy of projecting russian power. some will say it is an effort to reconstitute the soviet bloc. i t
is the number one supplier of energy to ukraine is russia. the number one debt is to russia. the president's proposing the american taxpayers send foreign aid to ukraine which will immediately go to russia. which strikes me as putin saying fine he'll be happy to take the taxpayers' money. >> that's nonsense. first of all, congress, by the way, is compared to when you're there, they're never there. they're out all the time, they can't get anything done. he can't authorize any money through the imf unless the congress adopts it. that's what he's trying to say. by the way, if you're talking about, you know, putin was going to lend money to ukraine. he lent them 3 billion which he's not going to get back. if you want to take over ukraine, you're taking over a bankrupt country. the idea that somehow another -- by saying we want to give the money, yeah, i think we ought to help them get out of bankruptcy just like general motors or something. >> but won't that money -- won't a large part of the money go directly to russia? >> no, it won't go to the russians. yanukovych who was their guy, he got
it is a brokerage business. >> what happened once we did energy and we broker oil and we hang up the phone. we went into the shipping brokerage business. what is the difference? service and brokerage. you are not taking the risk, you're helping clients achieve their goals. you hire smart oh. we do huge amounts of analytics on real estate. nobody else does. mostly people say the real estate lead 45. instead of saying find to this kind of space at $31.90. bgc/cantorlass at and you jam and every piece of real estate. how do you decide which wants to buy? the same way you should be analyzing what real estate to invest in. what should you rent? that is why we are doing spectacularly well. big bcg is.ow it is a public company. about 450 billion dollars. how is cantor these days? >> we only had a billion 500 million in capital. morganlook at what stanley has, it keeps us nice and safe on the sidelines. we are owing to do things that ouran outperform with brains. take the managers and let them use in the platform they want. is getting in that business. how are you going to get in there? >> we are smart and
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the energy situation. thank god, the weather is going to get warmer soon. he has those levers. he has an overwhelming military capability. there are many, many things, but particularly energy. but, you know, this has been bad for the russian economy. the value of their currency has fallen, the stock market is down. there is a negative reaction to this, too, that may effect putin's economy. and could i mention one other aspect of this is putin also sees -- here's this beautiful and large and magnificent country called ukraine. suppose ukraine, finally, after failing in 2004, gets it right, democracy, gets rid of corruption, economy is improving, and it's right there on the border of russia. so i think it makes him very nervous, if there were a success in ukraine in bringing about a free and open society and economic success, which is not the case in russia, as you know, which is propped up by energy. >> charlie: should we revisit the question of georgia and nato? >> yes. i really believe that we should sponsor the inclusion of georgia into nato. every few weeks the russians move the fe
economic leverage over ukraine because of the supply of energy. he has some influence in western europe, which still gets 25% of their energy from russia. so i think he's sitting there thinking that, in fact, he probably holds the better hand here for whatever negotiation is to come. >> charlie: do you believe he holds the better hand? >> frankly, based on what i'm hearing out of western europe and the reluctance of the europeans to embrace tough sanctions, i think, at least right now, i think he does. >> charlie: so if the europeans are not willing to go forward with tough sanctions, we're in a bad place. >> i think we are. >> charlie: you also have suggested some of your fellow republicans should tone down their rhetoric. >> well, this is a serious crisis that the west is facing, and, you know, when i -- i spent most of my life in the government at a time when, during immediate crises, people came together and were supportive of the president basically with the old line that politics stopped at the water's edge. i think people, right now while the president is trying to get the allies
some energy, but to turn that into money might be seven to ten years' window. but what's important about phase one if you have major oil players from the u.s. and russia and europe and china engaged in the sector, in the eastern mediterranean alongside israel and cyprus which relates to then turkey and the e.u. and all of that, it might create for lebanon an investment in its stability and its long-term viability because of the importance of energy. similar to what, how the gulf sort of gets its stability and security. the gulf countries are, you know, strange tribes, but they survived because they have important resources. other parking lots of the world -- parts of the world sometimes have that as well. that's very important for lebanon's geostrategic environment. if the east and west agree that this must be a peace offul zone because there are important resources here, now actually moving forward on what's the economic value of this, the first thing is to figure out how to get it to market. the market is effectively europe. the original approach was or the plan was certainly to
throughout this time? no. >> the e-mail from kevin conroy, terry's campaign manager alleges energy prices have risen over the past few years. they claim prices will continue to rise if the keystone xl pipeline isn't approved by the president. it says i'm proud of the work leer the have i doing to lower energy costs at home by passing keystone xl. it doesn't stop there. the group also expressed how they feel their elected officials aren't taking them seriously. even when they've made trips to washington to see the lawmakers who represent them. >> i used to think whoever you elected in office, juvenile, they were working for you. >> for you. >> that's not the way it's happening? >> i woke up. i was a guy -- i was that naive. until we went to washington, like i said, we went to senator johanns, his first comment to us was i don't care about you and the pipeline. >> on september 19, boldnebraska.org executive director was bullied by republican lawmakers at a house hearing on keystone xl. >> what qualifies you? we've got three experts. do you hold a graduate level degree in any relevant field?
.com. >>> the power of oil and gas, russia is a big energy supplier to europe, and that has global suppliers worried. we'll talk to ali velshi about that. >>> discussions at the white house between the leaders of israel and the united states. >>> an emergency session today at the white house. john terrett is life. the russians called this meeting. what were they trying to achieve? >> this was the third meeting in four days at the united nations security council. they have been talking only about ukraine and specifically about crimea. the russians called this meeting, and they wanted to put moscow's point of view to the rest of the world to explain what they really feel of the country of ukraine and the region of crimea. the long-standing ambassador to the united nations, read a letter which he said came from viktor yanukovych who was moscow's man until a couple of weeks ago, and called for russian forces to intervene in ukraine to save the country. afterwards they came out and read threater again. >> the country is in the grip of outright terror and violence driven by the west. in this context i app
a relatively modest economy with the exception of its energy capabilities and leverage. it's got a military that has a lot of nuclear weapons it's a conscript military. he is, today, punching way above his weight class, and the united states is punching way below ours. >> mr. secretary, thank you for talking to us, you bet. >> as the ukraine crisis gets worse even the mainstream media -- washington editorial saying president obama's foreign policy based on fantasy. former u.n. ambassador john bolton joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening, glad to be with you from london. >> yes. i don't mean to be heart beat on editorial. seems to be a departure when the "the washington post" comes out and uses the term fantasy at such an ominous time it's an accurate description of what's going on. the president's main problem is that he just doesn't care about america national security issues. he doesn't focus on it. he said back in the 2008 campaign that his priority was transforming american society. that's what he is up to. so, in 2008, nato made a terrible mistake when the europeans rejected our
,000,000,000 in energy subsidies to the ukraine because those subsidies are likely to be taken away because of an imf package. there is a real fear of what an imf loan package means, a structural adjustment package, huge cuts to the poorest in society to the sort we saw in greece and elsewhere, future unrest and the u.s. is quite a wear that when countries go down the road of imf loans, you can get even more unrest. another interesting thing about that energy subsidy is a lot of that money is going to end up in moscow because it's moscow who sells much of ukraine its fuel. in washington, they are quite a wear they are giving potentially a billion dollars to moscow. >> just how far is the u.s. supposed to go in supporting ukraine? at what point is it going to run up against opposition in congress? >> there is a lot of -- a lot of support for financial aid and financial loans to ukraine. however, the senate majority leader, harry reid said let's keep an idea on what europe wants. this is mainly a european issue. if europe isn't all for sanctions -- and they are not because they are scared of losing al
is so dependent on russia for its daily energy consumption that there's only so far they will ever be willing to push against russia no matter what russia does? so far they've been willing to say they will cancel a summit that was due to be held in russia and they're all saying more or less derogatory things about vladimir putin and his recent actions but not much more. can europe do more? are their hands tied by their dependence on russia in economic terms? can europe go further without hurting themselves? joining us now is p.j. crowley. he's a former assistant secretary of state for public affairs, currently a fellow at the george washington university institute for public diplomacy and global communication. mr. crowley, thank you very much for being here. >> always a pleasure, rachel. >> is there a limit on how hard the eu and the u.s. will push russia on this or any other issue? >> i think there's a style difference. europe prefers coordination, consultation, you know, convincing argument as opposed to confrontation. and obviously at 28 it's difficult to get consensus within th
to alternative energy. we have that story covered. >> the big day at the supreme court. they determine the fate of shareholder class action worth $80 billion in 20 years. we are streaming on your smart phone and your tablet. all of our interviews are live and on-demand on apple tv. ♪ biggest package shipping company is making another investment in alternative fuel. we are talking ups. compositionange the of the ups fleet in the united states. we recently went inside ups. you say the vehicles run on a variety of fuels. >> they do a lot. they have hybrids, pure electrics, cng compressed natural gas -- they have propane. they have had propane up in canada. the news today, they will make a $70 million investment to buy 1000 propane trucks. they're going to install about 50 fueling stations at various ups stations. they are introducing this propane fleet in the u.s. this will replace trucks in role areas. rural areas. they will reduce the use of ofut 3.5 million gallons diesel and gasoline. >> the purpose -- saving money. >> they have a couple of initiatives. whethera company -- it's looking at th
and atmospheric administration, the department of energy, the environmental protection agency, the nuclear regulatory commission and the national institute of standards and technology. all said the same thing -- it's not their responsibility. >> one of our frustrations is our government hasn't taken this on as something we should sponsor in terms of our national interests. there is often a lot of finishing pointing going on and we hope in the long run we can make progress to find a home, as we call it. >> reporter: in the mean time, he is relying on foundation support and doing some crowd sourcing. >> all it takes is filling up one of these containers. >> reporter: he launched a web site and created these kits to make it easy for anyone to do some fieldwork. interested individuals and communities pay $550 for the fox, gather samples and ship them to woods hall for analysis. the data is shared online. so far donors have funded 33 sample sites. but how is the radiation affecting the creatures that live in the sea and ultimately the human beings who enjoy eating seafood? >> this one. at's ces
program and washington said it should be allowed to produce energy. mr. obama will hold a similar meeting with the president in two weeks. orthodox jews were in west jerusalem over the weekend. they were protesting a law being debated in the israeli parliament with men to be drafted into military service and orthodox jews have been exempt and they want to keep it that way. >> it's important to tell the state of isreal that we are opposed to their political philosophies that we feel that the contribution that the elements of society are making will help the army and through our contributions and the religious spectrum we are arm and arm with the army, helping the state of israel. >> reporter: the new legislation is expected to pass in the next few weeks. ultra orthodox jews makeup 10% of israel's population. a california state lawmaker facing corruption charges says he is taking a paid leave of absence and he is accused of accepting about 100,000 in bribes including meals and golf games in exchange for his political influence. he is pleading not guilty. and he is the second california sta
going to they have to. the other critical part of the e.u. russian relation is energy supplies many european states are dependent on gas imports. germany leading this idea of toning down the rhetoric. it relies on russian gas supply for a third of its total supply. you could understand there is a reluctance to push forward, and i don't think we'll see that in the final statement. >> thank you. we'll have more on the unfolding crisis later in the news hour, including a look at why the crimeaen peninsula is so crucial, and why russia and ukraine are at logger heads. >> we're just getting breaking news. this is the developing story out of ukraine. we're being told this is news coming out of the headquarters of the ukrainian navy, and moscow has reportedly asked ukrainukrainian forces to lay dn their arms. we will be bringing you the latest on that story as it develops, and as we get the information. in the middle east let's move on to other stories now, and the united nations says fighting has started again in the palestinian refugee camp in damascus. there had been a truce between tha
that all he is interested in is domestic energy for peaceful purposes. the problem is that's not what's happening. what's happening is that the united states, through the state department and this administration, i think de facto has already but if not are on the verge of agreeing to allow iran to keep in place its enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, and i'm going to explain to you why that's a problem. if that capability is still there, if they retain all the facilities necessary for enrichment and reprocessing, even if they agree to limit to to a certain level for now at any point in time in the future they can ratchet it back up and they can go on to develop a weapon. in fact, the design for a weapon is the easiest part unfortunately of all of this. the hardest part is reaching the technological capability to enrich uranium to a certain point so you can weaponize it. if you allow them to keep all the equipment, all the technology, all the scientists, all that infrastructure in place, then at any point in the future when they decide now it's time for a weapon, they can break o
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and can fund the development of a lot of energy infrastructure, that will drive road, rail, and other transportation infrastructure we're talking about. you need a private sector impetus. dry?sentially the pot is the piggy bank is empty? >> it pretty much is. highway funding is done. vehicle miles traveled have been dropping. gas tax revenues are falling. the need for a public-private partnership. you have private money coupled with public management. why can't we get that done? >> that does happen. but the economic incentive has to be there. we start natural gas exports and crude oil exports. the prices equalize between the center of the u.s. where the crude oil piles up in barrels and the rest of the world -- you can have it better environment for private investment and international energy agency's have estimated that it is in the trillions of dollars, the infrastructure investment, to man come in to develop our resources of energy in the u.s.. do investors look at president obama's infrastructure proposal with any degree of belief or is it something that they say it has been propo
objectives affected by energy issues. while the national debate is over, tubes and mobile biological weapons labs, internal documents note that increased oil production in a post war iraq would have the vul effect of reducing world oil prices. >> prior to our even going to war in iraq, the focus was on oil. and iraqi oil and how to take it over far more than anything else. >> joining me now is rachel maddow, the host of the "the rachel maddow" show and "why we did it." what is the answer after all of your work on this? >> i think, andrea, the question is the most important part, which is the decisions of our generation on national security are determined more than anything by what the george w. bush administration did with that nine-year war in iraq and alongside of the 13-year war in afghanistan that's still going on. the american people are against those wars. those are the determine tif constraint for thinking about everything from crimea to syria to what the overall size of the u.s. military is. if we want avoid those protracted foreign -- we can't make good decisions until we understand
energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about two weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer, worsening prostate symptoms, decreased sperm count, ankle, feet or body swelling, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing while sleeping and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. ask your doctor about a
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